Looks like marriage equality advocates are one step closer to victory Down Under. On Wednesday, a majority of Australians voted in favor of supporting same-sex marriage. The non-binding vote revealed that 62 percent of citizens are in favor of allowing same-sex couples to wed, while 38 percent were against. Next stage? The Australian government will debate whether a marriage rights bill will be amended to the country’s constitution. If all things go according to plan, legislation can be passed in time for the holidays.

“[Australians] have spoken in the millions and they have voted overwhelmingly for marriage equality,” Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said following the vote in which 12.7 million citizens participated. “They voted yes for fairness, yes for commitment, yes for love.”

Generally speaking, people who voted in favor argued the debate is about equality, while those who voted against are concerned about the “definition of family” and how issues like gender will be taught in schools.

Understandably, the electorates with the most supporters were from the metropolitan areas of Melbourne and Sydney, with 84 percent voting in favor. Blaxland in New South Wales recorded the highest “No” vote at 74 percent. Australia’s chief statistician, David Kalisch, says citizens voted in droves. “This is outstanding for a voluntary survey and well above other voluntary surveys conducted around the world,” Kalisch said. “It shows how important this issue is to many Australians.”

With Australia added to the mix, 26 countries now allow gay marriage, according to the most recent Pew data (you can see the full list here). In Mexico, gay marriage is only legal in some jurisdictions, while Belgium was one of the first to legalize same-sex marriage in 2003, though the fight began in 1998. Belgium closely follows the Netherlands, which made history as the first country to legalize same-sex marriage with a three-to-one margin. Elsewhere, the majority of countries made their decision around 2015. And this summer alone, Germany and Malta both legalized same-sex marriages.

So what country will be the next battleground for gay marriage? This year, Taiwan’s highest court ruled that it was not tenable to deny same-sex couples marriage rights, which makes it the first Asian country to introduce equal marriage. Hopefully, other countries in Asia will follow suit, though that’s not always the case. South Africa was one of the first countries in the world to introduce equal marriage laws, allowing same-sex couples to wed in 2006. Yet 11 years later, it remains the only nation in the continent to have done so.

Despite the resounding vote, same-sex marriage still isn’t technically legal even in Australia yet. The change sounds simple enough: lawmakers just have to remove the declaration that marriage in Australia is the union of “a man and a woman.” However, only two parliamentary sitting weeks remain for the year. In that time, members of the country’s parliament will have to agree on how to legalize same-sex marriage in an exceptionally short duration of time. Not to mention, The Sydney Herald reports that a handful of MPs have vowed to ignore the public’s will and vote against the bill anyway.

The people have spoken, but the people aren’t lawmakers. This vote was a voluntary postal survey, meaning it is not a binding mechanism to alter Australia’s Marriage Act. However, due to the poll’s result, politicians now must act on the verdict by facilitating, amending and passing a bill. This, judging by the controversy conjured thus far, could get messy.