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There Is or Isn’t a Link Between Phones and Cancer, Depending Whom You Believe

There Is or Isn’t a Link Between Phones and Cancer, Depending Whom You Believe: Via Wikipedia.org

Via Wikipedia.org

It turns out holding a device that emits radiation next to your head for prolonged periods on a daily basis is bad for your health.

A new study conducted by Dr. Igor Yakymenko claims that cell phone use does increase a person’s risk for certain types of cancer.

“These data are a clear sign of the real risks this kind of radiation poses for human health,” Yakymenko said.

The study, which is known as a “meta study,” combined results from hundreds of previous studies that examined the effects of cellphone radiation.

“(Our) data were obtained on adults who used cell phones mostly up to 10 years as adults,” Yakymenko said. “The situation can dramatically differ for children who use cells phone in childhood, when their biology much more sensitive to hazardous factors, and will use it over the life.”

So, how bad were the results?

That damage can add up over time and cause a variety of health problems, like cancer, headaches, fatigue and even skin problems.

For example, using your phone for just 20 minutes a day for five years increased the risk of one type of brain tumor threefold, and using the phone an hour a day for four years upped the risk of some tumors three to five times, Yakymenko said.

So basically, we’re all going to die from brain tumors, right? Not according to John Hayward of Breitbart, who claims the risk is being overblown.

The NYDN does specify that Yakymenko and his team conducted a “meta-study,” which is “basically a study of hundreds of other studies,” which is important to remember. Meta-studies inherit all the problems of their component research, including the problem of age – cell phone technology evolves very quickly, so popular devices from 2015 could be significantly different from those of 2012, 2008 or earlier. Most major studies cover very long periods of time, by necessity, so a great deal of the information piped into a meta-study could be based on devices dating all the way back to the 1990s. Yakymenko mentions in the article that his data was “obtained on adults who used cell phones mostly up to 10 years as adults,” which by definition means some fairly old devices were involved.

In the end, it all comes down to who you trust: a New York tabloid interviewing a random Ukrainian dude from the National University for Food Technologies in Kiev or a right-wing blogger writing for Breitbart.

Hooray for modern journalism!

(Source: NY Daily News, Breitbart)

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