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10 Chefs Share the Best Advice They Ever Received

10 Chefs Share the Best Advice They Ever Received: Angie Norwood Browne

Angie Norwood Browne

Everyone loves giving unsolicited advice, which is often quite annoying. But when the advice is from some of the best chefs in the country, it’s welcome. That’s why, as part of our Amusing Bouche interview series, we asked 10 chefs: What’s the best advice you ever received? Not suprisingly, we learned a thing or two.


SEAN BRASEL
Miami Beach restaurant
Cooking advice? Cook with passion and follow your heart. Living advice? If it flies or floats, it’s cheaper to rent it! (laughing) Sorry. Too much caffeine today.

BROOKE WILLIAMSON
The Tripel
When you stop enjoying what you’re doing, do something else, or it will show.

JASON STANHOPE
FIG
My mentor, Mike Lata, is a never-ending wealth of real-world knowledge. I’ve got a Moleskin filled with his Lata-isms. We get philosophical about everything from chaos theory to maintaining relationships to the trials of bestowing principle. The lesson that motivates most of my decisions in, and out of, the kitchen is about being humble enough to recognize your weaknesses, being confident enough to transform them into strengths and being wise enough to pass those lessons on to those around you. Making someone better than they thought they knew they could be starts with being humble.

DAVID BARZELAY
Lazy Bear
Your career should be the thing you can’t keep yourself from doing in your spare time.

JASON FRANEY
Restaurant 1833
“If you want it, you will get it. Never stop trying.“ This advice was given to me by Daniel Humm.

NINA COMPTON
Compère Lapin
To be yourself.

RICHARD BLANKENSHIP
CBD Provisions Create your own personal standard for everything—quality, professionalism, etc.—that is independent of where you work and whom you work for. This is the secret to becoming a chef who can span across kitchens, markets, and continents.

TONY MAWS
Craigie on Main
Learning to cook takes time. There is no way to expedite the process of learning this craft; so work hard, put you head down, and be patient… really patient.

RILEY HUDDLESTON
LondonHouse Chicago
While I was attending culinary school in the British Virgin Islands, I completely messed up a large batch of bread and got pretty angry with myself. The chef came over and assured me he could fix it—I was amazed! When I asked how he could fix something that I thought was trash, he said, “a great chef knows how to fix mistakes because he has already made them. The more you mess up, the more you learn and become a better teacher.” Based on this comment, let’s just say that I could be considered a GREAT chef.

GAVIN KAYSEN
Spoon and Stable
Two things define you: Your patience when you have nothing, and your attitude when you have everything.


WATCH: THIS IS A MASTERCLASS IN GRILLING FROM CHEF ORI MENASHE AT BESTIA


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