When you think of Tinder, the dating app conjures images of mindless swiping, low-investment relationships and, perhaps most notably, “a thing to do while you’re on the john.” But according to new research published in Personality and Individual Differences, the app and its impact on dating culture is more than that. In fact, merely using the app can reveal one’s predilection for casual sex.

In case it weren’t already obvious, if you’re on a dating app in the first place, it kind of means you’re down for no-strings sex. This is now a verified science. The Turkish study determined that Tinder users tend to have lower levels of “sexual disgust” and higher levels of “sociosexuality.”

For those who have no idea what these words mean, lead researcher Barış Sevi explains that sexual disgust is relative to one’s sensitivity toward sex. For example: Hearing people have sex would make those with high levels of sexual disgust uncomfortable. Sociosexuality, on the other hand, relates to one’s ability to seperate love from sex. They tend to view the act as less restrictive; they don’t require an emotional bond to get down.

In a nutshell, Tinder users are the antithesis to the buttoned-up prude. This culmination supports past research of 10,000 students by LendEdu that found young adults are five times more likely to seek casual sex than a relationship.

However, the most prevalent reason millennials used dating apps was to feel better about themselves, according to almost half of the same sample. An interesting reveal, considering research from North Texas found Tinder has a tendency to make men feel self-conscious.

The study declared that men may actually be more susceptible to body shaming and emotional vulnerability on the app for two reasons. One, because men far outnumber women on the app, and two, because men were found three times likelier to swipe right. As such, they open themselves up to more rejection; it does make sense.

But guys can be jerks, too. Research from overseas revealed men believe they have “licence to use women as they see fit” if their date appears less attractive in person than they do in photos. This sentiment somehow translated to men feeling entitled to have casual sex with these women to compensate for the “breach of trust.” Brutal, right? Let that simmer.

The aforementioned survey also found that over 70 percent of Tinder users say they’ve never actually met someone from the app, so calling Tinder a “dating app” is no doubt a misnomer, but I guess fewer people would be up for downloading an app for anonymous sex.

“I believe the takeaway message from our research is that disgust can still affect our motivations to use a smartphone application,” Sevi told PsyToday of his research. “This is a very compelling finding to show that the evolutionary theories have explanatory power even in today’s technological lifestyle.“

While Sevi notes he’s looking forward to conducting more research on the links between our emotions and smartphone activity, a long-running social survey in the U.S. has already found that, while dating apps have produced more progressive attitudes toward casual sex, millennials are actually three times less likely to be sexually active than their parent’s generation.

As for how this is possible, millennial expert Jean Twenge told the Washington Post that, while plenty of young adults are getting action on these apps, less fortunate-looking millennials are sort of screwed because if people are swiping for sex, they’re looking for the guy or girl with the hottest pictures. Personalities don’t really apply on the inherently shallow dating app. (Enter this new dating app that filters your potential matches based solelly on appearance.) That is, unless you have a killer bio.

“It ends up putting a lot of importance on physical appearance, and that, I think, is leaving out a large section of the population,” Twenge begins. “For a lot of folks who are of average appearance, marriage and stable relationships was where they were having sex … [and dating apps may be] leaving some people with fewer choices and they might be more reluctant to search for partners at all.”