Climate change deniers aside, we’ve reached the point where the maxim to “Make Earth Day everyday” is more crucial than ever. That said, April 22 is always a nice reminder to be mindful of the planet in general and, in particular, to pay greater attention to the impact the items we buy and use have on the environment.

The holy trinity of “reduce, reuse, recycle” is always a good place to start. It’s also important to remember the the three are hierarchical, i.e. it’s better to reduce than to reuse, and better to reuse than recycle. But if you’re doing any of them, you’re on the right track.

The desire to buy new things, whether it be clothes or gear, is tough to break away from. But if you are going to cop, cop responsibly. The gear in this guide will help you do so and earn you a fist bump from Mother Earth.


Adidas

Adidas

ADIDAS REAL MADRID PARLEY JERSEY
$90, adidas.com
What at first glance appears to be a standard-issue soccer jersey for Cristiano Ronaldo’s club team Real Madrid, is actually a sustainable marvel. The yarn on the jersey is part of a collaboration with Parley for the Oceans, and is created in part by using reclaimed and recycled garbage from the ocean.


Miir

Miir

MIIR VACUUM INSULATED BOTTLE
$29.95, miir.com
At this point, everyone knows that plastic water bottles are bad, right? But that plastic lid on the coffee cup you get every morning isn’t much better, either. Miir’s bottle is insulated so you can use it to keep your coffee hot and your water cold (just give it a rinse in between, OK?) without any waste. And 5 percent of the revenue generated from these bottles helps fund clean water projects around the world.
Patagonia

Patagonia

PATAGONIA R1 YULEX WETSUIT
$429.99, patagonia.com
Last year, Patagonia accomplished the seemingly impossible task of removing chemical-laden neoprene from its cold water wetsuits. Now, the plant-based Yulex rubber is part of all of the brand’s wetsuits, including this one, which will help you get in the ocean a lot sooner than July 4th this summer.
Dr Bronner

Dr Bronner’s

DR. BRONNER’S PURE CASTILLE SOAP
$17.99, drbronner.com
Dr. Bronner’s has been making its castille soap forever. And the company’s commitment to sustainability hasn’t wavered during that time. The soap, which can be used for everything from washing your body to your dishes, is made from organic coconut oil from Africa, organic olive oil from Palestine and Israel, and organic palm oil from Ecuador that is all fair trade certified and features no GMOs.
Tesla

Tesla

TESLA SOLAR PANELS
Price unavailable, tesla.com
While Tesla is often thought of as a car company, it’s perhaps best characterized as an alternative energy company. Tesla’s automobiles are powered by electricity instead of gas, and it innovating in the field of solar energy. It’s recently-revealed solar panels have an incredibly slim profile that is barely noticeable on a home. One place it will be noticed is in utility bills, which will be a lot less than on-the-grid solutions.
Outerknown

Outerknown

OUTERKNOWN EVOLUTION SHIRT JACKET
$195, outerknown.com
When surfing champion Kelly Slater left his longtime sponsor Quiksilver after many years, he launched Outerknown with a commitment to sustainability, without compromising on style. This shirt jacket is made entirely from its signature Econyl fabric, which transforms old fishing nets into a recycled nylon. It’s the perfect layer to throw on pretty-much year-round.
Alta

Alta

ALTA REDSHIFT SM
$15,495, altamotors.co
Speaking of Tesla, the race to become the “Tesla of motorcycles” is definitely on. Electric motorcycles produce zero emissions, which is a huge plus for the environment. The challenge has been to make them as fun as their gas counterparts. Alta’s Redshift Supermoto is designed to be a quick and agile bike on the asphalt. It has a range of 50 miles and produces 120 ft-lb of torque, which is significantly more than a Ducati Hypermotard 939.
Jungmaven

Jungmaven

JUNGMAVEN HEMP BANDANA
$36, jungmaven.com
Let’s clear something up: Wearing a hemp bandana doesn’t mean you’re wrapping weed around your neck. Hemp is actually one of the most sustainable fibers out there, providing a number of benefits to the planet. These bandanas are made of 100 percent hemp, and look sharp whether they’re around your neck or stuffed in a blazer pocket.

Justin Tejada is a writer and editor based in New York City. Follow him on Twitter at @just_tejada and Instagram at @justin_tejada.