Facebook announced today that it is taking a serious stance against non-consensual image sharing, otherwise known as revenge porn. The social media juggernaut is implementing new “photo-matching technologies” across its three massive platforms—Facebook, Messenger and Instagram—in an effort to thwart the online, non-consensual sharing of someone’s intimate images.

Considering the fact that one in 25 Americans have been threatened with or have been victims of revenge porn, it’s nice to see that Facebook, with 1.86 billion active users, is one of the first platforms to announce a company-wide initiative to fight back—especially since victims tend to be women. After all, according to recent Cosmopolitan survey, 64 percent of women have sent a nude image of themselves.

“These new tools are a huge advancement in combatting non-consensual pornography and I applaud Facebook for their dedication in addressing this insidious issue, which impacts the lives of individuals and their loved ones across the country and around the world,” U.S. Representative Jackie Speier, who has led the fight in Congress to legislate against the dissemination of revenge porn, said in statement.

Users are already able to flag unflattering, suspicious or harmful images of themselves on Facebook’s platforms posted without their permission. Once an image is flagged, the photo will then be reviewed by members of Facebook’s content operations team and will be removed if they find it in violation of Facebook’s strict community standards. In cases of revenge porn, the account that shared the image will also be reviewed and perhaps even removed as well. And then, Facebook’s aforementioned new photo-matching tool will detect if other users have share the image while also blocking them from doing so.

Facebook’s sudden action comes in light of more celebrities having their nude photos or sex tapes leaked as well as a recent discovery that U.S. Marines were sharing nude photos of their female colleagues in a private Facebook group. Facebook consulted with the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative, the National Network to End Domestic Violence, the Center for Social Research and the Revenge Porn Helpline in the United Kingdom, among others, to determine a set of best practices. Thus far, its photo-matching tool seems to be the best bet at stopping the proliferation of revenge porn from profile to profile. Unfortunately, because the tool can’t protect images shared within private groups, there’s only one way to be absolutely certain that explicit images of yourself never end up online: don’t take them in the first place.