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California Convicts First Person Under New “Revenge Porn” Law

California Convicts First Person Under New “Revenge Porn” Law :

2014 has been a landmark year for California’s legal fight against sexual predators. In September, Governor Jerry Brown signed into law the nation’s first “Yes Means Yes” legislation to deal with sexual assault on school campuses, and now, California has convicted their first criminal under the new “revenge porn” law that went into effect in October of last year.

In violation of two restraining orders that instructed him to stay away from his ex-girlfriend, thirty-six year old, Los Angeles resident, Noe Iniguez posted nude photos of his ex-girlfriend on her employer’s Facebook page. Additionally, he slandered her as a “drunk” and a “slut.” In the past, a victim of such an attack had little recourse. That’s all changed thanks to the “revenge porn” law.

After a seven-day trial Iniguez was convicted by Judge David Fields. The new poster boy for “revenge porn,” Noe Iniguez has earned the distinct dishonor of being the first person found guilty of the crime. He was sentenced to one year in jail. He was also ordered to serve 36 months probation and attend domestic violence counseling upon his release from jail.

With this new law in place, California intends to send a warning to all future perpetrators of “revenge porn.” The court’s decision is an unmistakable sign that the state takes this issue seriously and will mete out jail time to anyone convicted.

“Revenge porn” is defined as “the posting of nude or sexually explicit photographs or videos of people online without their consent, even if the photograph itself was taken with consent.”

Since 2013, thirteen states have enacted laws against posting nude images or video without the consent of the the person in the photo/video. As the Jennifer Lawrence #Celebgate scandal has shown, there is a rapacious online culture of sexual abuse. Perpetrators of the crime can be anyone, strangers or, say, a former intimate (such as an ex). California’s prosecution of this first “revenge porn” case proves the state intends to keep pace with Internet crime, in this instance, non-consensual nudity that’s posted online.

Remember consent isn’t just sexy … now it’s becoming the law.

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