You probably didn’t realize this, but Jennifer Aniston’s nipples are kind of a big deal. A quick Google search on the subject brings up 1,420,000 results, including articles about how her nipples were the real stars of Friends, YouTube compilations of their many TV appearances, and social media accounts dedicated to them.

This week, in an interview with the actress attached to the nipples, Vogue told Aniston, “Someone recently called you the OG of #FreeTheNipple because of how often Rachel’s nipples showed through her outfits.” Whaaat? Sorry, Vogue, but that’s just silly. Aniston’s nipples are not tiny activists that poked through her shirt on network television to make a statement about gender equality. As wonderful as her nipples may be, they did not predict the invention of social media and its restrictive policies about images of topless females. Friends ended in 2004. Twitter and Instagram didn’t exist yet, and Facebook was so new it probably had about five users. The Free the Nipple documentary, which lead to the official campaign, didn’t come out until 2014.

Of course, Aniston is polite enough not to point out how stupid it sounds to credit her for inspiring the #FreetheNipple campaign. Instead, she told Vogue, “Yeah, I don’t know what to say about that! It’s just one of those things, I guess. I wear a bra, I don’t know what to tell ya! And I don’t know why we’re supposed to be ashamed of them—it’s just the way my breasts are! But hey, OG, I’m not going to complain!”

Anytime a famous woman’s nipples are spotted in public, whether her nipple outlines are visible through her clothes or because she’s wearing something low-cut or sheer, articles pop up claiming that she is a #FreetheNipple advocate. Not every nipple is a political nipple, and not every woman is fighting for her right to go topless in public—or on Instagram. Sometimes nipples are visible whether or not anyone intended for that to happen.

Aniston told Vogue she doesn’t understand the weird obsession people have with celebrities’ bodies. “If you’re going to walk out and have your nipples showing, or your belly is a little bloated, or you’re not at the weight you want to be—you are perfect no matter what you are and no matter where you are and who cares! You have to tune out the noise, which is fine by me, because I just know that I’m happy and healthy and doing everything I can to be good in the world and to the people I work with.”

She doesn’t use social media, but last year, she wrote an essay for the Huffington Post about the way women’s bodies are constantly criticized, calling it “absurd and disturbing.” She wrote, “We get to decide for ourselves what is beautiful when it comes to our bodies. That decision is ours and ours alone. Let’s make that decision for ourselves and for the young women in this world who look to us as examples.”

Later in that essay, she wrote “Sometimes cultural standards just need a different perspective so we can see them for what they really are — a collective acceptance… a subconscious agreement. We are in charge of our agreement.” Aniston isn’t concerned about nipples being visible in public—she’s concerned about how women are portrayed in the public eye. Of course, if the world really wanted to focus on ending the objectification of women, they’d have to stop focusing quite so hard on Aniston’s breasts.