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Here’s What You’ll Be Wearing Next Spring

Here’s What You’ll Be Wearing Next Spring:

The fashion calendar makes no sense. Let’s just start there. The normal human being looks at the screen on their iPhone, sees that the date is July and feels firmly entrenched in Summer Sixteen (shout out to Drake). For the fashion world, however, the space-time continuum is all thrown off. Even though summer is officially only a few weeks old, all of the summer clothes have already gone on sale to make room for all the fall clothes that are about to start arriving, even though the average guy hasn’t even started to think about what he’ll be wearing come September and is just trying to enjoy wearing shorts while he can.

Things get even more mind-bending when you look at the calendar for fashion shows. New York Fashion Week: Men’s took place this week, not to exhibit garments for fall, but to reveal the looks for spring/summer 2017. Yes, a full year from now. For someone who doesn’t know what he’ll be doing an hour from now, let alone a year from now, it can all be a little confusing.

There are certainly companies making inroads toward having clothes available to buy as soon as the fashion show concludes, but for now, the fashion calendar is still the fashion calendar, in all of its f’d up glory. There is an upside to it. Summer, after all, is fleeting. Seeing the styles from a year in the future preserves that summer vibe just a little bit longer.

And Summer ‘17 promises to be a stylish one. Here are the trends that popped up on the runway that will be worth jumping on after you get your tax refund next year.


Robert Geller (left); Stampd (right)

Robert Geller (left); Stampd (right)

DUSTY PASTELS
If you think pink and purple are “girl” colors, then you’re missing out. A number of designers utilized pastels for their collections. But they weren’t bright neon hues that felt loud. Instead they were muted, dustier versions of the colors that came off rugged and masculine, as if you’d trekked through the desert.


Ovadia & Sons (left), N. Hoolywood (right)

Ovadia & Sons (left), N. Hoolywood (right)

BOMBER JACKETS
The bomber jacket is going absolutely nowhere. In fact, the jacket only seems to be evolving. There were longer, trench coat-length bombers, patchwork bombers, embroidered bombers. The bomber jacket’s cousin, the coach’s jacket, was also in full effect. It makes perfect sense because you always need that lightweight layer to take with you no matter how hot it gets outside.


John Elliott (left); Rochambeau (right)

John Elliott (left); Rochambeau (right)

CHOLO COLLARS
Perhaps it owes something to the rise of the L.A. menswear scene, but there were a lot of tops that borrowed the custom from cholo culture of buttoning only the top button on shirts and jackets and spreading the rest of the placket across the body. Aside from creating a very striking look, it also has the effect of allowing other layers to be revealed. So if you don’t want the T-shirt you’re wearing to be completely covered up, you can still give it some shine alongside your shirt or jacket.


Tommy Hilfiger (left); Perry Ellis (right)

Tommy Hilfiger (left); Perry Ellis (right)

FLOWERS
Like pastels, floral prints are generally considered to be more feminine. But designers pushed the envelope and showed just how cool they can be on guys too. Everything from palm fronds to roses were on display and none of it was the least bit “girly.” In fact, it gave the clothes an earthy, natural vibe that felt well-suited for spring and summer. Some labels, like Tommy Hilfiger, went with a more outfront approach to the floral patterns, while Perry Ellis opted for a more subtle approach.


Rochambeau (left), Perry Ellis (right)

Rochambeau (left), Perry Ellis (right)

SHINY PANTS
While not quite Puffy and Mase level, lots of pants went down the runway with a certain sheen to them. That was accentuated by the fact that the pants were looser (welcome news for guys who never came around to the whole skinny jeans thing) which gave the shine a sense of movement and flow. The pants also felt lighter, like the kinds of things you’d want to put on when it’s 95 degrees out with 95 percent humidity.


Justin Tejada is a writer and editor based in New York City. Follow him on Twitter at @just_tejada.

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