Pornosexuality is used to describe a person who prefers to watch porn than have sex. Despite the reservations one may have being associated with the term, there are intelligible reasons one may identify as pornosexual, most of which boil down to our growing dependence on technology and its impact on our social skills and self-esteem.

Because we have societally been consumed by wave after wave of technology, we’ve grown increasingly comfortable in the digital space and consequentially less comfortable in social environments.

The impact this cultural shift has had on us sexually is monumental. “The convenience of getting off online without the potential work, vulnerability, intimacy, and connection with others can be appealing to some,” Christene Lozano, a certified sex addiction therapist told Medical Daily. “Pornsexuals experience all of their sexual pleasure in isolation instead of shared,” sex therapist Amanda Pasciucco echoes.

Pornosexuality, which sounds like a slighly less insolent way of saying “porn addict” differs from most orientations as it is a learned behavior. The lesson of which is taught through limitless, click-of-the-mouse exposure to valleys of free explicit content. Based on one’s rate of consumption, this material has the ability to desensitize the viewer’s brain and body and will eventually become overstimulated. For five to eight percent of the adult population, porn can become a legitimate addiction. If used long enough, it can grow to become the only way a person gets aroused.

Medical Daily indicates that using porn to replace sex is no different than using drugs to numb the desire to be intimate with or share a deep connection with someone. They add that because men are more likely to use porn (research has found that 98 percent of men have watched porn and only one in four porn viewers are female), they are far more susceptible to porn addiction.

But while pornosexuals have come out of the woodwork to say they would “choose porn over real sex any day” experts struggle to deduce whether this newfangled proclivity is a legitimate source of sexual expression, or whether its roots dig deeper.

Some professionals believe pornosexuality is a cheap way to mask insecurities. Take for instance, a fear of intimacy or connection. Dr. Fran Walfish believes the orientation is no orientation at all. It’s merely another way of saying, “I’m an intimacy-phobe.”

It does seem plausible that pornosexuality is an excuse issued by the unmotivated. But the appeal is understandable in this particular climate. Somebody who identifies as pornosexual is reluctant to go out and speak with the opposite sex because that requires effort and it can be uncomfortable. It makes them feel self-conscious, fearful and rejected.

Porn, on the other hand, has none of that. It’s convenient, generous and 100 percent void of judgement. In other words, it affords the luxury of laziness.

“Who needs sex when you have porn?” is the new “Who needs to call when you can text?” But as is true with most things, moderation is key. In other words: punctuate your porn with actual, I-can’t-believe-I-thought-porn-was-better-than-this sex.