Mischa Barton is the latest celebrity to find herself the victim of a leaked sex tape. Perpetrators best beware, though: Barton’s lawyer, Lisa Bloom, is not to be trifled with. According to Bloom, the video “was recorded without [Barton’s] consent by someone she was seeing at the time.” Her warning to whomever might try to sell said video is filled with righteous rage over the situation.

“There’s a name for this type of disgusting conduct: revenge pornography. Revenge pornography is a form of sexual assault…And we will not stand for it. I have a message for anyone who attempts to traffic in these photos or videos of Ms. Barton: we will find you, and we will come after you. We will fully prosecute you under every available criminal and civil law. You proceed at your peril,” she said.

In a press conference today, Barton spoke out for the first time. “This is a painful situation and my absolute worst fear was realized when I learned that someone that I thought I loved and trusted was filming my most intimate and private moments, without my consent, with hidden cameras,” she said.

The courts have established a precedent for locking up revenge porn distributors. In 2015, Kevin Bollaert was sentenced to 18 years in prison for running a website that allowed people to post explicit photos of women without their consent, sometimes alongside their personal information. He then charged victims $350 to remove the photos. Photos were primarily posted to the site by angry ex-husbands and boyfriends. Then, in January of this year, the hacker who stole and leaked nude photos from 300 email accounts, including some belonging to Jennifer Lawrence, was convicted and sentenced to nine months in prison.

Bloom’s stern and slightly terrifying warning to the people behind intimidating Barton will hopefully be enough to shut down distribution, but that being said, the depraved people behind these schemes are often hard to stop.

Revenge porn is not about sex. My guess is that for most men, it’s not their go-to masturbation material either. It’s purpose is only to make women feel ashamed and scared, and to make the scorned men who post it feel powerful and in control. It exists only to psychologically assault women, not to provide pleasure. Women are under constant threat of assault in the physical world; the violations of consent that take place on revenge porn websites prove that their virtual presence isn’t safe either.

Women like Bloom who won’t stand for an internet culture in which women can be threatened are not, thankfully, alone in the fight. For two years now, Google has been removing revenge porn images from it’s search results. Facebook has been slower to join the movement. The social network has twice faced with lawsuits for failing to remove revenge porn images from the site.

For Barton, the news comes during a rough patch in her life. She recently admitted herself to hospital following erratic behavior, only to find out later that she had been drugged at her own birthday party. But in the words of Bloom, “When [women] stand up on their own two feet and they say, ‘No, I’m not going to stand for this, I’m going to fight back’, it’s very empowering.”