A new study published in Sex, Reproduction and Gender from the Kinsey Institute investigated how age affects how much sex you have. No suprise, young people, specifically ages ages 18 to 29, have more sex than older people, with an average of 112 times per year. That works out to roughly twice per week. Those 30 to 39 years old do it way less, averaging just 86 annual romps. That’s about once a week with an added sex session on each holiday. In last were ages 40 to 49, who had sex 69 times per year. See the trend here? Not surprising.

Researchers note that married couples’ results were all over the map, probably because people of all ages are married. Results determined 34 percent of married couples have sex two to three times a week, which is on par with young singles. However, most married couples only have sex a few times a month. Thirteen percent do it a few times a year.

What’s most interesting about this study is its conclusion: the loss of sexual appetite among aging adults isn’t to blame for the drop in sexual frequency. Instead, they cite that life and physical changes are what ultimately get in the way of your once-healthy love life. In other words, older adults want to have sex, but life gets in the way.

It’s easy to understand. Those dreaded family get-togethers, having children, having grandchildren, miscellaneous surgeries, bad hips, birthday parties, anniversary parties, baby showers, work events and all that other fun adult stuff can certainly make sex a lower priority. At the end of the day, a lot of us truly are pretty damn tired.

If one’s propensity to cheat is at all indicative of sexual appetite, people in their fifties are most sexually starved. Research from the University of Utah found that people over the age of 55 are more likely to cheat than those under 55. Ultimately, it was found most people cheat 20 to 30 years into marriage. The reason they do it is because over time, they develop more lax attitudes regarding what their relationship has to look like.

In a study from the University of Indiana, lead researcher Dr. Herbenick told Woman’s Day that 61 percent of women ages 18 to 24 had an orgasm during their last sexual experience, whereas 65 percent of those in thirties did and 70 percent of women in their forties and fifties. Reasons often cited for better orgasms at an older age are improved sexual confidence and being more comfortable with communicating sexual desires.

Now let’s compare that with today’s youth. This year alone, we’ve reported on study after study that has found young people are having lots of very bad sex. Leap-frogging onto that trend is new research out of the University of New Brunswick (we reported on additional insights from the university’s work here) that studied the sex lives of 16- to 21-year-olds and found that 79 percent of men and 84 percent of women have reported sexual issues ranging from low sexual satisfaction, low desire and an inability to reach orgasm.

So instead of thinking that sex becomes less frequent because of age, let’s instead realize that sex can get better with age as a result needing it less and being better sexual partners via experience. Yeah, that’s a more positive spin.