The 1992 Super Bowl is still etched in my memory, not in sepia tones but vivid Technicolor. I couldn’t tell you who won, or even played (the Redskins bested the Bills, for those keeping score). I was 10 years old—too old for toys, too young for dating. My family, including cousins, uncles and grandparents, sat huddled in our Omaha basement, a blizzard blowing furiously outside. Suddenly, Cindy Crawford sped into our lives, her cherry-red Ferrari Testarossa kicking up dust.

While the ad was an announcement for the new Pepsi can design, it was Crawford who made the world take notice. With that white tank top, Daisy Dukes and soon-to-be-iconic beauty mark, she was confident and dangerously sexual, in a way that I had never seen. Hormones flooded the bloodstream, and my sexual awakening was over when the ad ended exactly one minute later.

This Sunday, Pepsi is bringing Crawford back for a pseudo-remake of the classic commercial. Consciously or not, the spot is a nostalgic denouement to a Golden Age of sexy ads. If Ridley Scott’s 1984 Apple ad introduced advertising as art, Crawford’s 1992 spot launched the hyper-sexualization of televised advertising, a movement that charts society’s ever-changing definition of “sexy.”

“People still ask me, ‘What was it like to kiss Leonardo DiCaprio’s ex-girlfriend?’”

Now, with the #MeToo movement in full swing, the Carl’s Jr. brand of scantily clad models making love to hamburgers seems, for better or worse, as obsolete as Zima. In the dawn of this brave and nervous new world, 2018 may mark the death of the “sexy” Super Bowl ad.

“I wouldn’t be surprised if we don’t see any sexy ads this year,” says Richard D’Alessio, an industry vet with over two decades of experience. He directed the 2003 Bud Light “Yoga” ad, featuring two guys ogling women during a yoga class.

“I did a Bud Light ad with Cedric the Entertainer,” says D’Alessio, referring to one from the 2001 Super Bowl featuring the comedian accidentally spraying his paramour with beer. “Cedric’s getting all excited on his date and shaking up beer bottles in the kitchen. He opens the bottle, and it explodes all over the girl’s face. That was designed as a facial joke. There’s no doubt that we were constructing jokes centered around sex all the time.”

“I don’t see ideas like 'Catfight’ anymore because sexy has evolved.”

Sunday will provide the first opportunity to see how the #MeToo movement impacts the holy bastion of testosterone that is Super Bowl Sunday. “All throughout the industry, there are more women assuming creative and business power within the agency and client, across the board and around the world,” says D’Alessio. “Women are still the dominant consumer, so you see campaigns that women are putting out that are geared towards women. Campaigns are trying to get women to feel more positive about themselves, and to see themselves differently. That conversation started years ago, and it’s now just becoming the zeitgeist.”

Actor Jesse Heiman cemented his place in flushed, sweaty pop culture history as Walter in Go Daddy’s “Smart Meets Sexy” campaign, alongside supermodel Bar Refaeli. The 2013 Super Bowl ad sparked controversy with what might be the longest, loudest kiss in marketing history. Thousands of viewers used the Twitter hashtag #NotBuyingIt to flag and rate the commercial, which was seen as objectifying women and stereotyping computer programmers.

“In the wake of the movement, I get it,” says Heiman. “But in the ad, she’s leading the charge. She’s in control, and it was five years ago. People still ask me, ‘What was it like to kiss Leonardo DiCaprio’s ex-girlfriend?’ It was good for my career. I’d do it again.”

The actor, who has popped up as an extra in scads of popular films, is quick to point out that the mood on sets is very different now. In the wake of the ad, Heiman admits that there was bullying that bordered on harassment from crew members, asking if he “got hard” filming the spot.

“[Cedric the Entertainer] opens the bottle, and it explodes all over the girl’s face. That was designed as a facial joke.”

“Everyone is super careful now,” says Heiman, who has since appeared on Criminal Minds and recurred on NBC’s Powerless. “We’re told on set immediately that if anything happens to make us uncomfortable, to speak up, so the situation can be handled in a positive way. It’s not just the superstars who are being protected. It’s everybody.”

Emmy-winning director Erich Joiner has seen the sexual evolution firsthand in his decades-spanning career. This includes memorably sexy spots such as Miller Lite’s infamous “Catfight” (2003), showing two women sparring over whether it’s the great taste or less filling that is the chief attribute, and Bud Light’s “Clothing Drive” (2010), featuring men disrobing in the workplace to get free beer.

“I hope the ads are affected this year,” says Joiner. “I think the movement is really important. I’ve been doing Super Bowl commercials for over 20 years, and I think that it’s something that has needed to be addressed for a long time. There needs to be change.”

Brands have been stepping away from sex for years, with Carl’s Jr. ending its sexualized campaign in 2017 to focus on the food. Companies are adjusting their marketing to millennial sensibilities, spotlighting authenticity, sustainably sourced materials and what a brand “stands for” over skin.

“I don’t see ideas like 'Catfight’ anymore because sexy has evolved,” says Joiner. “I don’t think the public would find it sexy anymore. I like to do work that is interesting, topical, smart, funny or heartfelt. I’ve based my whole career on that. If you turn on an NBA or Final Four game, you’re not going to see those kinds of commercials anymore. It’s a bygone era.”

Megan Samperi, for one, isn’t ready to say goodbye to the ribald escapism altoghether. Playboy’s February 2018 Playmate has an Instagram mentality and sun-soaked “brand” that defines sexuality for a generation raised on social media, not Cindy Crawford.

“Confidence is very sexy to me,” says the 24-year-old Samperi. “Being yourself and not caring about what other people think. I meet people who say, ‘It’s sad that you have to show your body.’ The weird thing is that it’s new-generation people who have a problem with it. There are guys who wouldn’t date me because I posed in Playboy, while they’re slutting it up and hooking up every night. Meanwhile, I’m loyal, but showing my body. Nothing’s wrong with showing the world your body.”

As for the big game, Samperi hopes that we still get a little action during the commercial breaks. “I love football, but it’s a long game, and everyone wants to see the sexy, humorous ads,” she says. “We all love staring at the TV and drooling. What’s wrong with that?”