The Dick Click is the latest innovation in male contraception, and given the name, it’s no surprise that it wasn’t invented by a medical professional. Rather, it was created by a German carpenter by the name of Clemens Bimek. That’s right, a literal woodworker wants to alter the way your wood works.

The device, which is one-inch long and weighs less than a tenth of an ounce, reportedly allows men to literally “switch off” their semen flow using surgically-inserted valves. Immediate skepticism aside—valves? In my scrotum?—Bimek believes his namesake device, the Bimek SLV, is as effective at preventing pregnancies as traditional methods. In other words, the device could serve as a far-less permanent alternative to the vasectomy, which, I’m sure you’ve heard, can be quite painful.

Five percent of men who receive vasectomies in the U.S. go back for reversals, and even after the reversal procedure, there’s only a 55 percent success rate concerning pregnancy. This number drops further the longer you wait.

Implanting the Bimek device only takes half an hour. Once fastened on each spermative duct, men will be able to physically switch the valve on and off through their scrotum. When on, the device diverts the sperm away from seminal fluids, rendering him sterile. If pregnancy is the goal, however, just flip the switch and presto, your swimmers are back in action.

Obviously, the idea of turning your scrotum into an interactive pipeline comes with risks. “My assessment is that implanting the valve could cause scarring where it meets the vas deferens,” said Wolgang Bühmann, a spokesperson for the Professional Association of German Urologists. He adds that this scarring could inhibit the flow of sperm even after the the valve is switched off.

However, Anneke Loos, the head of a medical product testing center in Hannover, refutes this claim, insisting that other implants made from the same material as Bimek’s are tolerated elsewhere in the body. “The question is whether it will cause problems when it is implanted in this area,” she said.

“Many of the doctors I consulted didn’t take me seriously,” Bimek has said. That makes sense, since he is currently the only man with the implant. “But there were some who encouraged me to go on tinkering and helped me with their expertise.” Hartwig Bauer, the urologist who carried out Bimek’s operation, believes the invention will soon be preferable to a vasectomy. In order to attain medical approval, the valve will be implemented in 25 men in trials starting this year.

If you’re reluctant to turn your scrotum into a robot, new research published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has found another promising, more natural method. According to researchers, two vital chemicals found in folk medicine can help block the fertilization of eggs, which leads researchers to believe they could use these chemicals in a form of hormone-based contraceptives. A plant-based male birth control pill, essentially.

Obviously, we seem to be making serious strides toward an attainable male birth control, despite lots of recent hang-ups. One thing’s for sure: we need to find a middle ground between the stealthing and the permanence of vasectomies.

See how the Bimek SLV works below.