According to Instagram’s nudity policy, male nipples are okay, but women’s nipples are taboo. What’s the difference, really?

The Genderless Nipples Instagram account, which has gained more than 50,000 followers in six weeks with just 70 posts so far, is posing that question by posting extreme close-ups of nipples of both genders on the platform. The images are so close up that they obfuscate the subjects’ genders.

“Men are allowed to show their nipples, women’s get banned,” reads the bio on the account, which was started by three advertising students in New York. “Support ALL genders! Let’s change this policy!”

Instagram’s policy prohibits nudity, specifying, “This includes photos, videos, and some digitally-created content that show sexual intercourse, genitals, and closeups of fully-nude buttocks. It also includes some photos of female nipples, but photos of post-mastectomy scarring and women actively breastfeeding are allowed. Nudity in photos of paintings and sculptures is okay, too.”

In December, a photo on the Genderless Nipple account that turned out to be of a male nipple was removed by Instagram. The account owners posted a photo of the removal notice with the caption, “Instagram, you can’t even tell the difference between male and female nipples; who could? So why even bother banning female nipples if they can be so similar?”

The account accepts “nipple donations” from people at least 18 years old and asks for well-lit photos of nipples that are hairless and hard (“to make it extra difficult for Instagram”) from a “coke can distance.“

This account isn’t the first protest against Instagram’s double-standard nudity policy. Critics, including Chelsea Handler, have been using the hashtag #FreeTheNipple since 2012, usually posting photos they know will be removed—especially artistic, non-pornographic images that show that the “female nipple” is nothing to be afraid of, nothing that needs to be banned.

Instagram is in a tough situation; they do need some sort of policy to avoid becoming overrun with pornographic images like Twitter and Tumblr. That will easily happen if they remove all nudity standards, but their solution is insufficient. There are so many innocent, beautiful, artistic, expressive ways to show nudity, and to lump all images of female nipples in with pornographic images is reductive and damaging.

Your future is created by what you do today, not tomorrow. 🔥🔥🔥

A photo posted by Genderless Nipples (@genderless_nipples) on

Of course, the image policy of a social-media platform is far from the largest affront to women’s bodily autonomy taking place right now (thank you, anti-abortion conservatives, sex-work crackdowns, overregulation of birth control, and of course, the constant barrage of media telling women what’s wrong with their bodies!), but it is just one more brick in the wall. Instagram is just one more place where women’s bodies are regulated and censored.

While it’s a longshot that the #FreeTheNipple campaign or the Genderless Nipple account will have any real impact on Instagram’s policy, they’re important statements that let the platform and its users know this kind of double standard is no longer the blindly-accepted norm. Unfortunately we’re further from this day than many may believe, but we are on our way to a society where women get to decide what to do with their bodies and are taught to love their own natural state.

“Society is changing,” Evelyne Weiss, one of the administrators of the Genderless Nipple account, told the Guardian. “We want to show Instagram that their policy is not working in today’s society anymore.”