New concerning research out of Newcastle University suggests that virtual reality porn, which aims to bring your wildest sexual fantasy to life, could one day blur another indistinct line: that between intercourse and consent.

If you’re unfamiliar with VR porn, it’s the porn industry’s most impressive innovation to emerge in years. It places you, the user, inside a porn scene via a large, clunky headset like the Oculus Rift or Playstation VR. You’re no longer just a spectator of smutty content; you become a participant. More than 500,000 VR clips stream every day, according to Pornhub.

In the U.K.-based study, researchers gave participants (24 of whom were men, 28 were women and three identified as “other”) an introductory sentence that described a man who was about to embark on his first-ever VR porn experience. Subjects were then asked to continue writing his story for 10 minutes.

Before that, though, researchers divided 30 participants into two groups. One group was asked to describe a “perfect” sexual experience, while the other group wrote about a “precarious” sexual tale. While the first group’s stories were fine, lead researcher Matthew Wood said the second group’s stories “often went far beyond what would be acceptable in real life, with sometimes violent imagery featuring men performing degrading sexual acts on women or forcing themselves upon them.” There there was also the standout observation of “an apparent disjoint between ‘virtual reality’ and ‘real reality’ and a negotiation of barriers between them.“

“Our research highlighted not only a drive for perfection, but also a crossover between reality and fantasy,” Dr. Madeline Balaam said. “Some of our findings highlighted the potential for creating 3D models of real-life people, raising questions over what consent means in VR experiences.”

In fact, the lines between real and fantasy had become so transparent that in some cases, researchers argued that the use of VR porn could be considered cheating, based on how real some experiences can feel. Building on this, researchers wondered whether VR experiences could have an impact on how people handle consent in real life—and whether or not fantasy porn could become preferable to actual sex. Researchers even believe VR porn could be used as a veiled form of revenge, speculating that users may base a model on a real person and place them in dangerous sexual scenarios.

“If a user created a VR version of their real life girlfriend, for example, would they do things to her that they knew she would refuse in the real world?” asks Balaam.

VR will undoubtedly give users who feel sexually repressed the opportunity to explore scenarios they’ve always fantasized about consequence-free. That’s quite the draw for everybody, but more so for people wanting to explore more perverse taboos and kinks, from rape fantasies to revenge sex.

While the most common themes in fantasies have been reported to be milquetoast—from the pursuit of a perfect sexual experience (because no such things exists) to being a dominant, masculine partner (a reflection of men’s self-confidence) and sex acts that are extremely heteronormative—serious ethical questions are raised when it comes to recreating more shocking fantasies.

While some could argue that this is a safe and relatively healthy way to act out sexual taboos, researchers are more hesitant. “Revenge porn is already illegal, but there are many work-arounds, and once digital content is out there, there is very little you can do,” Wood said.

That’s why these researchers are rallying around the idea that the future of sexual VR experiences needs to “be more positive.” But at the end of the day, this likely won’t happen, as VR porn was designed with the fantasy in mind—and some people’s fantasies will always be more perverse than someone else’s.