By now, you probably heard the outlandish story of a failed undercover operation worthy of its own docuseries.

On Monday, The Washington Post released the bizarre details of a conservative sting operation gone bust. According to reports, a woman now believed to be an employee of Project Veritas—an anti-media organization founded by radical right-wing extremist James O’Keefe—contacted a Post reporter hours after they published an exposé on Senate hopeful Roy Moore.

In the article, Leigh Corfman claimed Moore molested her when she was 14, and he was 32. Three other women disclosed similar accounts, claiming Moore pursued them sexually while they were between the ages of 16 to 18. “We don’t believe these women,” said Moore’s campaign strategist, while vehemently denying the allegations.

After that story broke, a woman named Jaime Phillips contacted The Washington Post with a story of her own. Claiming she had a sexual relationship with Moore that led to an abortion at the age of 15, Phillips initiated e-mails, calls and in-person interviews over the course of several weeks. When her story could not be verified, a little more digging revealed Phillips was not who she seemed to be, and The Washington Post refused to run her story.

Phillips has since been linked to Project Veritas, where undercover agents are hired to create aliases, follow a script and collect hidden video footage of their targets. This organization uses extreme tactics to infiltrate mainstream media outlets and expose what they describe as media bias. She was caught trying to bait Post reporters into running a false story, thus discrediting the paper. When Phillips fabricated a backstory for her “character” that involved statutory rape, she perpetuated the most damaging rape myth of all—that female and male victims of rape lie.

Here is the problem.

According to national statistics, one in four women and one in six men will be sexually assaulted in their lifetime. The National Center for Lesbian Rights estimates 64 percent of transgender people have experienced sexual assault, while the CDC reports four out of 10 gay men have experienced sexual assault or rape. Even with so many demographics affected by sexual violence, only five to 40 percent of rapes are reported depending on the population. Many victims of sexual assault fail to report rape due to the fear of being unbelieved by their peers, authorities and loved ones. A fear of public humiliation, retaliation or further victimization also deters victim from coming out.

In reality, only an estimated two to 10 percent of sexual assault reports are false, meaning evidence proved the crime never occurred. This incidence rate is strikingly low considering only 30 out of 100 cases move to trial, and the conviction rate can be as low as eight percent. This percentage of false reporting is on par with other violent crime and not even close to being a common occurrence.

More importantly, false accusations of rape rarely lead to incarceration.

When a sexual perpetrator is a prominent figure, sexual assault victims are subject to widespread public scrutiny. It took 30 women to come forward before the public supported the indictment of comedian Bill Cosby in 2015, after decades of rumors circulated within the entertainment industry about his sexual misconduct. In the end, Cosby was only charged with three counts of aggravated indecent assault and is still awaiting a retrial.

The American public should not continue to give credence to a myth that is not based on logic, yet used to block justice for victims of sexual assault.

In 2016, Donald Trump was elected president after 13 women accused him of rape, sexual assault and sexual harassment, including his ex-wife Ivana Trump. He was even the subject of a child rape lawsuit during his presidential campaign. Trump remains in public office, though his victims are among those pushing for his impeachment.

While these are prominent cases of sexual crimes committed by celebrities, it illustrates the low probability of sexual assault survivors ever receiving justice—even when they choose to report. Phillips’ fabrication is not only harmful to actual victims of sexual assault, it was meant to undermine the process of journalistic integrity and replicate a scenario that has haunted the field of journalism in recent years.

Two years ago, Rolling Stone retracted a viral story about a University of Virginia student who claimed to have been gang-raped at a fraternity party in 2012. After several media outlets identified inconsistencies in her story, an internal investigation by Rolling Stone revealed flaws in its reporting and editing process. The magazine issued a public apology after settling a multimillion-dollar defamation lawsuit brought by UVA’s former dean of students who was negatively portrayed in the article. Rolling Stone quietly settled its defamation case with the implicated fraternity this summer, agreeing to pay Phi Kappa Psi $1.75 million.

Most mainstream media outlets follow strict fact-checking protocols, but the Rolling Stone scandal proved this process could be flawed. Its outcome only added to the myth that false rape accusations are common, but Rolling Stone’s $4.75 million payout dramatically decreased the likelihood a journalistic oversight of that magnitude will ever occur again. As a veteran reporter for The Washington Post stated, O’Keefe’s plan never would have worked.

In the days since Project Veritas was outed for trying to plant a fake story in The Washington Post, O’Keefe has declined to address speculations he works with Moore or former White House strategist Stephen Bannon. Despite O’Keefe’s efforts to thwart the article’s momentum, Moore’s victims have continued to come forward. They have provided a public account of how they were victimized as children that does not deserve to be ignored. Though critics have projected Moore would be subject to an investigation by the Ethics Committee if elected and likely expelled from the Senate, he still has ardent supporters.

The American public should not continue to give credence to a myth that is not based on logic, yet used to block justice for victims of sexual assault. Corfman has since published an open letter imploring Moore to admit the truth and stop publicly attacking her character. Times are changing, and as more and more victims speak out, we need to believe them.