Last year, the Women’s Index Study found that three-quarters of women believe the 21st Century is the best time in history to be female, with nine in 10 women identifying femininity with strength. But while there’s no denying women have made great strides toward equality, there’s still much work to be done. We’ve seen this very fact carried out in various news outlets this week, with headlines both applauding women for their progress and highlighting how far from equal they remain to be. These are the most compelling finds.


TIME TRAVEL IS MORE ATTAINABLE THAN WORKPLACE EQUALITY
One in four Americans believe we’ll have conquered time travel before workplace equality. While efforts toward achieving gender equality in the workplace are generally aimed toward women–she needs to be more aggressive, more forceful in salary negotiations, more confident and less entangled in family matters–new research from the Rockefeller Foundation and the Global Strategy Group suggests it’s actually men who need to make the necessary changes.

A survey of 1,010 Americans ages 18 and up found 65 percent of respondents believe the attitudes of men in top leadership positions hinder female leadership. These issues remain evident as you descend further down the corporate ladder. Ninety percent of women said male attitudes are a barrier at work and 50 percent of men agreed. Huffington Post, the first to report the results, mentions that despite the disappointing outcome, respondents believe both genders are equally capable of thriving in leadership positions. Yet there are only 32 female CEOs in the Fortune 500, which amounts to a measly six percent.

Things are so off-balance in corporate America that one in four citizens believe humans will figure out time travel before women reach equality. Maybe that’s because a third of Americans believe women aren’t interested in leadership roles and 42 percent believe women lack the confidence to achieve these roles. Perhaps most offensive though, is the fact that nearly half believe there aren’t enough qualified women to fill the leadership positions.

WOMEN DON’T SAY MUCH ON SCREEN
Last year, only a third of speaking roles in films belonged to women. Unless you’re white, able-bodied, straight and male, you’re underrepresented in media, a new study published by the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism reports. The school touts its findings as “the biggest study of film characters ever conducted,” analyzing close to 400,000 roles in 900 movies released between 2007 and 2016.

Last year alone, only 31 percent of of characters who had speaking roles in the year’s 100 most popular movies were female. Additionally, 29 percent were non-white, three percent had disabilities, one percent was gay or bisexual and absolutely none were transgender. Researchers argue that film is ignoring everyone who does not fit under the ignorant umbrella of “straight white male.” Considering the results, it’s difficult to disagree. This was especially true for women of color. Almost half of the movies analyzed had zero speaking roles for black women. That figure jumps to two-thirds for women who are Asian and Hispanic.

According to the report, “The results reveal that there has been little to no meaningful change in the representation of these diverse groups in popular movie content since 2015. In fact, when it comes to the representation of black, Hispanic, Asian, and mixed-race people, there haven’t been any improvements since 2007.”

WOMEN CAN’T PARTY WITHOUT THE THREAT OF RAPE
The relationship between sex, drugs and alcohol is something of a roller coaster. While these substances may influence confidence, new research has found that one in 10 women admit they’ve been sexually molested or raped under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol. What’s more, almost half of people–that’s men too–have had sexual intercourse at least once in their lives with someone they wouldn’t have slept with had they been sober. Cheating is more common as well. One in five of people surveyed said they had cheated on a partner while under the influence.

WOMEN HAVE MORE SAFE SEX THAN MEN
According to a Centers for Disease Control report released in 2016, cases of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) reached an all-time high in the United States. Because this news is terrifying, Cosmopolitan and Esquire teamed up to study where we’re going wrong in terms of protecting ourselves. According to the 1,454 respondents, most of the blame can be placed on men.

For instance, 58 percent of men say they haven’t been tested in the past year, whereas only 33 percent of men have. This is no excuse, as 81 percent know where they could get tested—they just choose not to. This explains why men were found three times likelier to have never been tested at all. Arguably, this could be why women were twice as likely as men to say they’ve had an STI. Maybe some guys do, they just don’t know it. Likewise, 31 percent of women said they’d have sexual intercourse with somebody who couldn’t when they’d been tested last compared to almost 60 percent of men.

Not surprising, women more often initiate the conversation on testing. Fifty-two percent of women said they began the conversation about STI testing with their most recent partner, compared to less than 30 percent of men. What’s being passed around these days? The publications verified the most common STIs are chlamydia (18 percent), HPV (11 percent) herpes (five percent) and gonorrhea (four percent).

MORE WOMEN ARE BARING ALL THAN EVER BEFORE
For Love magazine’s 18th edition, on stands now, the pub chose to celebrate women like Ashley Graham, Emily Ratajkowski, Alexa Chung, Stephanie Seymour and more with sexy, nearly nude and nude black-and-white pictorials. This appears to be less a trend and more a box to check as of late, with many female celebrities capturing themselves nude on their own terms by posting on social media. WOmen like Ariel Winter, Ashley Graham and Bella Thorne are regarded as pioneers on that front. As a result, the presence of nudity in publications seems to be a non-issue these days. Take Lady Gaga and Taylor Kinney for V, Kim Kardashian for Paper and more recently, Serena Williams for Vanity Fair, for instance. Not to mention every woman who has appeared in our own magazine, of course.

See some of the editorial images for Love magazine below, shot by the talented Patrick Demarchelier.

BOOM 💥💥💥 @emrata by @patrickdemarchelier for Love 18

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