In theory, a one-night stand is the ideal situation for men (and some women, too, depending who you’re talking to). There’s little conversation required, absolutely zero commitment, and you get to have sex. What more could a man possibly need?

As a bonus, you have the option to cautiously skip out on the uber-awkward and sober morning exchange while you both endure that special kind of headache that can only be cured by food saturated in grease.

But while it’s no secret men love themselves a good ol’ one-night stand, women aren’t often so eager about the prospect. And, as new research by online medical service Dr. Ed points out, there’s a good reason why.

The study, which surveyed 2,000 men and women, found that only one in 10 females achieve an orgasm during a one-night stand. Which is pretty pathetic considering the study found 64 percent of men climax in the same circumstance. Based on these results alone, it’s easy to see why there’s such a discrepancy among the genders regarding a single-night dalliance.

This revelation builds on already existent research that found straight men are the worst at giving orgasms, but the best at achieving them. This result at the time was an ode to women and their sexual superiority and a much-deserved wake-up call for guys. But obviously, we still haven’t learned our lesson.

The more a woman knows a a person she’s having sex with, the likelier she is to climax. With a new partner, women orgasm 14 percent of the time, while men would climax 47 percent of the time. With a long-term partner, women would orgasm 29 percent of the time; men, 54 percent. And with a spouse, women would orgasm 29 percent of the time while men would orgasm 50 percent of the time.

These results also highlight the often-ignored perception that men don’t always orgasm either, which, as this research confirms, gets worse the longer he’s in a relationship. Well isn’t that romantic.

When it comes to sexual preference, gay singles were most likely to rush to sex (38 percent), followed by bisexual singles (23 percent) and straight singles (18 percent). As for sexual satisfaction, women were happiest in the very beginning of the relationship, about one to six months. Men, on the other hand were most sexually satisfied a tad later, about six months in. Again, both genders grew less satisfied the longer they’d been together. Isn’t monogamy grand?

Researchers then analyzed what factors contribute to orgasm and found that both lighting and alcohol can have an impact. For example, singles tend to prefer sex with the lights on, while married couples prefer them off. When it came to alcohol, men were much more likely to prefer drunk sex over women (which probably plays a monumental role in this lack of satisfaction on her part).

While our penchant for casual sex has never been stronger (a recent survey by Adam & Eve found 70 percent of Americans have engaged in a one-night stand), we’re obviously not doing them right. At least men aren’t.

Maybe it’s because these interactions lack an emotional bond, which influences men to be more selfish. After all, we are biologically predisposed to make dumb decisions.