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The Brand: Creative Recreation
  • August 13, 2012 : 13:08
  • comments

Yesterday we previewed shoes and sneakers for fall 2012 and while we stand by our many selections, one brand truly impressed us: Creative Recreation. Something about their innovative intention and design made us stand up and take notice. Whether it’s their fusion of two seemingly separate worlds or simply their uncompromising approach and appeal, they’ve caught our attention and while we’ve got yours, we’d like to share with you their brand style and story.

Back in the fall of 2002, Creative Recreation’s forefathers found themselves frustrated, fed up with the increasingly bland and divisive direction footwear was heading. Why, they asked, should casual comfort conflict with dapper dress? Why did the sophisticated have to be so closely associated with the stuffy? They saw in themselves a new type of consumer, a lifestyle consumer who didn’t discern between the two worlds, who wanted a brand to be both comfortable and casual, relaxed but refined. What was born was Creative Recreation.

What happened was something not even they could have predicted but what they had unknowingly foretold. The lifestyle consumer they had modeled after themselves had been lying in wait; fashion began to take turns toward the casual upper class. Suits were suddenly being worn with sneakers. The t-shirt/blazer trend of the late 2000s took off. The market was literally millions strong, and better yet it was multifaceted: everyone from celebrities to the casual consumer sought the fusion found in, among others, Creative Recreation.

To this day, creativity and invention are still the driving forces behind the company. Few ideas are met with resistance as the founders have witnessed firsthand the power a concept can have on the consumer, how an idea with a little drive and determination can be a catalyst to not only carve out a piece of the market, but to create one out of thin air.  

Featured above (from left to right):

The Classics, the backbone of Creative Recreation: Tucco Biscotti ($110), Ciro Lo in Grey Denim ($65) and Cortina Black ($120).

Low tops, where sneaker meets shoe: Cesario Lo Camo ($85)Kaplan Smoke ($60) and Tucco Vintage ($110).

High tops, because their badass: Cesario XVI Chocolate ($75), Vito Smoke ($85),and Solano Black Charcoal ($110).

read more: lifestyle, style, fall fashion

2 comments

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous
    I own 24+ pairs, and I don't regret 1.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous
    The only problem with them is the price. Keeps them out pf reach for most people. I never spend more than $30I on shoes. Can't afford to and any more than that is just ridiculous.
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