Khloé Kardashian

Khloé Kardashian, Cheating and the Frenzy of Gossip

Reality TV stars' problems continue to distract us—but from what?

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I cheated.” It’s two words that people have nightmares about. It’s two words that are the equivalent to emotional cancer. It’s two words that cause a myriad of different feelings to happen all at once. Anger, denial, betrayal, depression—and this is only immediately after hearing it.

The damage infidelity causes in a relationship is often well beyond any repair, but the scars it leaves on the cheatee are even longer-lasting. It makes you question everything, and everyone. “If someone I love can betray me and hurt me so badly, then how can I trust anyone? Even my friends?”
Well, for most people, your friends and family are the people you take solace in after you’ve been cheated on, the ones who provide emotional support. But for Khloé Kardashian, they’re contributors to the heartbreak. Jordyn Woods is Kylie Jenner's best friend, and has been for a long time. That was, of course, until this past Tuesday, when rumors spread quickly through the Jenner family that Kardashian’s boyfriend and father of her child, Tristan Thompson, was seen hooking up with Woods at a club.

Now, anyone who’s been cheated on can tell you it’s the most gut-wrenching experience of their romantic life. But to be betrayed by not only the person you love, but by the person you consider family—that’s catastrophic. It completely unravels your reality. It makes all the loving gestures, all the conversations and all the intimate moments feel like cogs in a colossal lie that's been chugging along for months, years or even decades. Jordyn Woods' relationship with the Kardashian family is said to have been in dire straights for the past few days, and justifiably so. 

Is that really escapism if we're just escaping into someone else's life, who is probably doing the same exact thing? What are we all escaping?

But this begs the question, why is this story being so quickly shared and covered? Hell, why am I even writing this right now? Partially, it just comes down to celebrity gossip. It's the idea that even the gods and goddesses behind the golden gates of Hollywood can go through the same problems that we can, and they’re not so different than us “normies” after all. But let’s say that is the case—then why does the obsession continue? Why does celebrity gossip account for a significant amount of people’s entertainment nowadays?

Hell, it’s not even celebrities anymore. Social media has turned everyone’s life into public entertainment, a free TV show. And now, there’s hundreds of millions of channels. Is this simply escapism taking a new form? Instead of watching a fictional rendition of reality, our new escapism is watching the “actual” reality.

Whether it's to feel less alone, or to sit on a throne of judgment and pick apart flaws, other people's actual lives have become cannon fodder for our own entertainment.

But if that’s the case, is that really escapism if we're just escaping into someone else's life, who is probably doing the same exact thing? What are we all escaping? What are we trying to avoid? Our own thoughts, our own fears, our own trivial lives? So instead, we want to be absorbed by someone else’s? We want to pick apart someone else’s? Does other people’s drama distract us from our own, or lack thereof?

I’m putting a lot of questions marks at the end of these sentences because I really don’t have any idea. It just seems that stories like the one you started reading when you clicked on this article have tremendous resonance. Whether it's to feel less alone, or to sit on a throne of judgment and pick apart flaws, other people's actual lives have become cannon fodder for our own entertainment. People simultaneously want to relate and to escape. From what, I’m not sure. All I know is that I escaped myself for a little while by writing this.

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